Who Is Your Mother by Paula Glenn Allen (Summary and Reflection)

Who Is Your Mother by Paula Glenn Allen – the article that greatly states the clashing ideas whether history must be forgotten or cherished. Paula in the first part of her essay told the importance of knowing one’s mother for the Keres believe it is the key to know our identity, and naming them would enable our cultural, spiritual, personal and historical web of life within the universe had a place. On the other hand, they also believe that inability to do so would lead to failure to the reality of the world – mainly, our right relationship to Earth and society. Moreover, she also discussed the view of Indians where they matter history to be remembered, which unlikely what the Americans view; the importance to forget the past. Both views were equally defended by the author; the first notion where maintenance of  traditional customs, values and perspective could slower the societal change, and the second notion where it views history a little value and therefore must be forgotten might become the root of oppression due to the lost of tradition and memory. She then added that if Traditional Indians be honoured by Native American, some possible results are quoted in verbatim: “the place of women in the society would be central, the distribution of goods and power would be egalitarian, elderly would be respected, honoured, and protected as a primary social and cultural resource, and therefore, the ideal beauty would be enlarged”. Most importantly, she concluded people would not see war anymore as a prime method of human problem solving.

It is a proposition that we miss half of our life if we don’t know who our parents are. More likely, the article reminds us the great role of our mother in the society would never cease whatever period of time we were. But if there is one thing that I don’t understand, that is why the title named “Who Is Your Mother?” The gist of her article is about the different angles of the two notions whether or not to value our past. In my own point of view, both have its pros and cons that we must bear in mind. FACT: the reasons for such ideas both boil down to the fact the desire to attain a better world. Now I understand, mother could be in its literal sense or a symbol of our planet Earth that we must take care of. Whatever of the two, matters to be considered for sure. After reading the article, I still don’t think that we must let our history burn in the back of our mind because in the first place, without the people from the past, our technology, freedom, civilization, customs and traditions would never be like what we were enjoying nowadays. Eradicating them might be practical to some, but alarming too for others. Given the quotation, what’s past is past, gives an isolated case to others who need to forget their past for personal reasons. But, I doubt that we could be this clever and strong enough without learning from it. For me, the article indeed presented a good argument, and it successfully convinced me to believe what she was trying to promote – the balancing of both ideas to improve our mother Earth, and the women’s state of today.

Who Is Your Mother by Paula Glenn Allen – the article that greatly states the clashing ideas whether history must be forgotten or cherished. Paula in the first part of her essay told the importance of knowing one’s mother for the Keres believe it is the key to know our identity, and naming them would enable our cultural, spiritual, personal and historical web of life within the universe had a place. On the other hand, they also believe that inability to do so would lead to failure to the reality of the world – mainly, our right relationship to Earth and society. Moreover, she also discussed the view of Indians where they matter history to be remembered, which unlikely what the Americans view; the importance to forget the past. Both views were equally defended by the author; the first notion where maintenance of  traditional customs, values and perspective could slower the societal change, and the second notion where it views history a little value and therefore must be forgotten might become the root of oppression due to the lost of tradition and memory. She then added that if Traditional Indians be honoured by Native American, some possible results are quoted in verbatim: “the place of women in the society would be central, the distribution of goods and power would be egalitarian, elderly would be respected, honoured, and protected as a primary social and cultural resource, and therefore, the ideal beauty would be enlarged”. Most importantly, she concluded people would not see war anymore as a prime method of human problem solving.

It is a proposition that we miss half of our life if we don’t know who our parents are. More likely, the article reminds us the great role of our mother in the society would never cease whatever period of time we were. But if there is one thing that I don’t understand, that is why the title named “Who Is Your Mother?” The gist of her article is about the different angles of the two notions whether or not to value our past. In my own point of view, both have its pros and cons that we must bear in mind. FACT: the reasons for such ideas both boil down to the fact the desire to attain a better world. Now I understand, mother could be in its literal sense or a symbol of our planet Earth that we must take care of. Whatever of the two, matters to be considered for sure. After reading the article, I still don’t think that we must let our history burn in the back of our mind because in the first place, without the people from the past, our technology, freedom, civilization, customs and traditions would never be like what we were enjoying nowadays. Eradicating them might be practical to some, but alarming too for others. Given the quotation, what’s past is past, gives an isolated case to others who need to forget their past for personal reasons. But, I doubt that we could be this clever and strong enough without learning from it. For me, the article indeed presented a good argument, and it successfully convinced me to believe what she was trying to promote – the balancing of both ideas to improve our mother Earth, and the women’s state of today.

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